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TCat001

Wanted - Full Bore Target Rifle

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I know of at least one person who wasnt using the "in equipment" and was dropped from the squad.

I wouldn't want to be involved with a squad where those two things were linked...

 

 

A friend was on the 2007 GB U25 squad. From memory squad members were encouraged to have a certain degree on uniformity, particularly barrel length so that sight adjustment was uniform and coaches didn't have to take individal variation into account. I gather than the US team even specify not just a standard barrel length, but even a particular rearsight.

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...they can stiffen up over the course of a shoot.

 

I was hoping your trade knowledge would come in useful. Thank you, I have experienced this a couple of times and wondered what it was. Folk borrowing my rifle afterward seemed oblivious (cooled down?). Only just got hold of a cocking tool to allow me to open up the bolt (well, to set it again afterward) but happy I don't have to.

 

Still takes the barrel out of the lock of the barn door at 1,000 yards in a stiff breeze though, which is all I really care about :)

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I know of at least one person who wasnt using the "in equipment" and was dropped from the squad.

I wouldn't want to be involved with a squad where those two things were linked...

 

 

A friend was on the 2007 GB U25 squad. From memory squad members were encouraged to have a certain degree on uniformity, particularly barrel length so that sight adjustment was uniform and coaches didn't have to take individal variation into account. I gather than the US team even specify not just a standard barrel length, but even a particular rearsight.

 

 

It's right that a well organised team wouldn't look favourably on sights that didn't give 4 clicks to the minute (whether because of the sight base or the design of sight). In practice that isn't really an issue in the UK because 30" barrles are very standard (though a few longer ones are appearing) and modern(ish) rear sights are all quarter minute clicks.

 

I've never heard of anyone not being allowed on a team because they had a particular make of rifle action. Ultimately it's all about scores (or, for team shooting, vertical groups) and if your kit doesn't allow you to produce the goods then that would hinder your chances. However, if you can shoot good groups then nobody would care what you do it with as long as it's mechanically reliable.

 

Here are my tips on fullbore rifles:

 

  • The make of action isn't really important for accuracy. Any of the actions mentioned in this thread will do the job and the comments about ease of operation and availability of parts are worth considering.
  • The barrel is critical to accuracy. This is a problem when buying second hand because you may not know if the rifle shoots well and, if it does, how long it will continue to do that. Hopefully the seller's scores might give you an idea of whether it's any good but somehow you need to try it out, or get someone you trust to try it out for you. The only consolation I can offer here is that even if you buy a new barrel at great expense you still don't know if it will be any good!
  • The stock and the bedding of the action is also important but a good visual check can help with those.
  • Don't necessarily be seduced by very fancy adjustable stocks. If you look at the GB team, they will almost all use simple wooden stocks probably with an adjustable (up and down) buttplate and, perhaps, an adjustable cheek piece. Firing points are never the same and you can never adjust a stock so that it will feel the same every time. Getting used to the variation in position is a valuable skill for fullbore shooting.

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  • Don't necessarily be seduced by very fancy adjustable stocks. If you look at the GB team, they will almost all use simple wooden stocks probably with an adjustable (up and down) buttplate and, perhaps, an adjustable cheek piece. Firing points are never the same and you can never adjust a stock so that it will feel the same every time. Getting used to the variation in position is a valuable skill for fullbore shooting.

 

 

Whilst it is completely true that firing point surfaces vary, which leads to positional variation, 'fancy adjustment' as you call it isn't exactly the point of having an aluminium stock. The forend profile is a fraction of the depth, which cannot be achieved with wood. Lower centre of gravity, and also allows for a lower position. An adjustable length butt is no different to putting spacers in, or taking a saw to the back end of the rifle, other than the fact it is easier to reverse! Aluminium is easier to look after, but wood isn't exactly difficult to maintain. A fully adjustable wooden stock is also not all that different in price to an aluminium stock, if purchasing new.

 

As long as a stock has solid bedding and you are comfortable with it, it is the best stock in the world. It really doesn't matter if its aluminium or wood. Until you've tried all the options you don't know which is best.
Its a frankly pointless argument which will rage on forever.

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Fair point. Wood is still a cheaper option and I just wanted to point out that it might also be the best option.

 

Back to the OP, unfortunately good fullbore rifles don't come up very often but hopefully someone might be able to point you to one.

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