Jump to content
leviticus49

Bipod For Bsa Martini Int Mkll

Recommended Posts

Is it possible to get a bipod for the above rifle? & if so can anyone sell me one please?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

York museum might have one.

 

Didn't someone say that these rifles don't have an accessory rail?

 

If that's the case and the club doesn't mind you doing it, you could remove the tightening bolt from a standard bipod and affix it to the stock via a screw or something similar.

 

Sounds a bit barbaric, but should do the job.

 

J

Edited by jonty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leviticus,

 

it is possible to get a bipod, but standard bipods will not fit. These are made to fit an Anschutz slotted rail. The BSA Mk II has a plate with screw holes; BSA did not fit a rail until the MK III.

 

Most BSA Mk II bipods I've seen clipped onto the side of the handstop. Could you get a stout piece of wire bent into shape?

 

Alternatively if you can find a bolt of the right pitch to fit the BSA, you could adapt a bipod as Jonty described. I'm afraid I don't know what the threads is; I suspect it's something obscure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to recall that there used to be a 'bent wire' bipod that fitted into the handstop on some of these rifles. Presumably the thread will be something like BSF, but knowing BSA it could just as easily have been a 'bicycle' thread or anything else.

Sorry not much help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only time you use the bipod is if you are not holding the rifle. Why not put it down on something like a kneeling roll or a block of 2x4.... same thing but less weight on the end of the rifle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. Is the bolt in a 'Anshutz' bipod captive or can it be removed completely. If it can, problem solved, I was given a few threaded sling swivels last week. I didn't fancy the idea of buying something new and then having to butcher it to make it fit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seem to remember it was something like 3/16" BSF, I have the tap at work and can check tomorrow as I made a rail that had the fixings closer together giving better adjustment or alternatively tap out one of the existing holes something like M6 then just use a set screw through a normal bipod.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having used and owned a BSA MkII I never used a bi-pod for my rifle I saw to many of them fall over and get the sights bent!!!!!!! Even now I only use the bi-pod on my Gemini stock for cleaning and then only if I do not have my MTM rifle rack. have always laid my rifle down on its side that way it will not fall over.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's fair comment Mark, and I think on a BSA where it would more than likely also sit on the bottom of the ejector lever, it wouldn't do that any good and could be prone (get it, prone) to falling over more easily.

 

However, on my rifle if I didn't use a bipod and laid it on the right hand side, the lovely knob on the bolt would be in contact with the mat, earth, concrete, whatever, or if I laid it on the left side my blinder would be doing the same.

 

I have never had any issues with instability on a bipod even when on my mat on soft ground.

 

As I believe they would say on Facebroke, 'Likes'.

 

Jonty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many Thanks to all the replies. I wanted to use a bipod for stability in cleaning and setting sights, plus I am a bit lairry(Yorkshire dialect for being concerned!) of putting the rifle down, sights up or down on the firing point. I hope to get a Anschutz type bipod in the near future, regarding the swivels, they come with a suitable bolt.

 

Leviticus 49

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leviticus,

 

the bipod should not be used to steady your aim. It's not strong enough for this, and is only intended to prop up the rifle when not in use or when cleaning. The rifle will still wobble, and the recoil won't be consistent.

 

If you want to get the rifle steadier, use a sandbag or similar. However zeroing from a rest isn't recommended, as resting the fore-end will alter the behaviour of the barrel as the rifle rifles, so the Point of Impact may differ slightly. This is especially relevant to the BSA MK II, where the fore-end is bolted to the barrel, and in most cases is in full contact with the barrel. With a free-floated* barrel the results between rested and position may be more simillar.

 

Ulitmately if you want to get the rifle steadier, make your shooting position more steady!

 

*Free floating is standard on most bolt-action rifles. The barrel is cantilevered out from the action, and makes no contact with the stock. This isolates the barrel from uneven pressure, which can be caused by the wood swelling/shrinking with changes in temperature/humidity, or inconsistent sling tension, and which interferes with the vibrations generated in the barrel by firing. Free floated barrels rely on the strength of the joint, stiffness of the action, and their own heavy weight for consistency.

 

BSA did realise that uneven contact between the barrel and wood should be avoided; stocks were made of high quality well-seasoned wood, and the fore-end was very carefully fitted around the barrel. But, when they repalced the Mk II, the Mk III had a free-floated barrel, although that's another story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want to use the bipod as a steady whilst shooting, just as a stand when cleaning the rifle especially the sights area. I have only just got back into smallbore shooting after about 40 years. I am having problems getting comfortable whilst in a prone shooting position but that's due to my age, lack of practice and not being used to the tackle - single point sling, borrowed jacket etc. I realise that these are only excuses and IT WILL get easier with practice. My coach gave me some exercises last night - stretching of the back and making the neck more supple. Thank You for the explanation of the 'Free-floating barrel', I didn't realise it made that much difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see; you had mentioned using the bipod to support the rifle when setting the sights, which normally means zeroing. The bipod is fine for cleaning.

 

Good luck, and it does get easier with practise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×