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Bsa Mk Ii And Mk Iii Surplus

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Our club has a surplus of BSA Mk II and MK III (Five in total). All are in good condition - all the owners moved up to Anchutz and they were gifted to the club.

 

If anyone is interested please PM me as these will be scrapped after 2 weeks.

 

(Location is Central Scotland.)

 

Simon

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Should have no trouble finding a good home for the rifles. BSA mark 11s have been recently been fetching a good price. Like £150.00+ and over $600.00 in the states.They do not have all the whisles and bells but have a short lock time and are very capable of good scores. It would be a shame to scrap them

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It would be a shame to scrap them

Amen to that. More than a shame if they're in decent condition. Better to see them passed on some way they might be shot again, or do you get a bounty for scrapping them? Might someone like Yardman take them? Americans would pay good money for these if in any condition at all. Why not try Mac Tilton http://mtguns.com/, he has an agent in the UK that buys up old club guns for the US benchrest/collector market.

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Simon.

 

Interested to know how you got rid of them.

Our club may want to get rid of a couple of BSA rifles in future.

 

Cheers

Dave

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Simon.

 

Interested to know how you got rid of them.

Our club may want to get rid of a couple of BSA rifles in future.

 

Cheers

Dave

To be honest they were handed in to the Police to be destroyed before I had a chance to sell them. :(

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Simon.

 

Interested to know how you got rid of them.

Our club may want to get rid of a couple of BSA rifles in future.

 

Cheers

Dave

Dave,

Missed the others,so if these come up for sale might be interested.

Please PM or email if you hear of anything.

nec

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I have a Mk II International I'm looking to sell on If you're interested.

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Martini actions arent they? Terrible for the shooter to the right who has to shoot through a hail of spent cases flying all over ! BSA ejected cases at our club easily fly all the way to the wall and then bounce back. And there is no way the shooter can eject less forcefully.

 

S

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Can you not rig up some wire trap?

Where would the fun be in that?

 

With a slight adjustment of rifle cant you can actually aim where your cases will land!

 

Who cares if you just shot an 8........a tingle on your neighbours sights with a spent case will make up for it :P

Add some wind and I guess this could become an admired skill, if not a whole new sport.

 

 

 

 

PS

I use an Anschutz ;)

 

Dave

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Martini actions arent they? Terrible for the shooter to the right who has to shoot through a hail of spent cases flying all over ! BSA ejected cases at our club easily fly all the way to the wall and then bounce back. And there is no way the shooter can eject less forcefully.

 

S

I knew a BSA shooter who having recieved a complaint at an open meeting about the accuracy of his ejected cases, was so upset that he went home and made a neat deflector that put the cases in a little pile next to him. I don't think that he is with us now, he was about 90 when this happened.

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Don't be too hard on the BSA Martini International.

 

It was a superb target rifle in its time in all its incarnations (Mk II - Mk V. We'll not bother with the Mk I, a prototype, really), and probably still is in the hands of someone who knows how to use it. For fast shooting there's nothing to beat an International. Current examples which might well have shot-out barrels could probably just use new ones to prolong the rifle's active life. It's got a great action with a short lock-time and from MKIII on the trigger was sensational. The MKII's wasn't too shabby either.

 

Many of today's retired and veteran shooters made their name with an International. Barry Dagger and Cyril De Jonckheere spring to mind. Must be others. Anyone stepping up here? (Apologies to our younger listeners.)

 

One big problem for modern techniques is that the butt is far too long. It was designed in the days or the really angled fullbore-type position and anyone who used one had to form their position round the rifle - often grotesquely - rather than the other way round as is customary with modern rifles with their infinite adjustments to everything. Except, that is, if one was prepared to take a saw to the butt. I've not seen many of those, and it may be that they've gone the way of all things but on the other hand perhaps people just didn't want to desecrate a beautiful object.

 

If you ever get an International, ensure the barrel is good (if not, replace it) shorten the butt, and bingo you've got a rifle as good as anything on the market today. Forget the ejection mechanism that causes so much hilarity to today's ingenues. It used to be almost universal, and it's not the shooter's problem!

 

I'm sure there are watchers on here who could wax lyrical about their old BSA. I learned to shoot on a BSA 12/15 and the frst rifle I owned was an International Mk II (we're talking mid 1960s here, ok?) and I got it because all the best shots in the club had one. It cost £28 second hand. Only one member had an Anschutz and he couldn't hit a barn door with it. OK, I made that up but he wasn't the best shooter in the club by any means. Probably more to do with him than the rifle, but what's an impressionable youngster to do, eh?

 

I really am sorry to be seeing these old and venerable rifles going for scrap more often than not, and I implore anyone who is in the positon of having to get rid of one to do their best to find a good home for it. I suppose they're like a vintage car that's beyond economic repair going to the crusher. Sad, but not necessarily inevitable. They might have had their time but in the right hands they could live again. There ARE people who will take them, and spares ARE available. These are an option for the club shooter who wants something different. The biggest problem for today's euro-rifle shooters is that the sights wind the opposite way. ;)

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John Pugsley from Devon has been an X class and GB shot for years and its all been done with a BSA although I don't know what model it is.

 

There are rumours he might be changing but I haven't seen him for a while

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Bill's don't be hard on the BSA International I found to be very interesting. Just to add alittle, the Mark 1 had an extractor that was very different to the Mk 11 and it was very fragil and very soon broke and for that reason the Mk1 was only on the market for around six month. Mine bought new in the early 50s, perhaps 1952 at a cost of £30.00 lasted till 1981 it then had to be scrapped.

My son recently purchased a very old Mk11. Never ever having fired anything other than Anschutz, his first two cards at 25yds were 96s and I think that five cards were shot before getting a 99. As for the BSA trigger. When having used his rifle and set the two stage trigger to 5.5ozs there have been complaints next time he used it. He was very impressed with the BSA single stage trigger and was somewhat surprised when I told him it was probably at least 16ozs. I am looking forward to giving it a go sometime soon. Dillion Lee did say that a BSA Barrel and an Anschuts receiver would make a very good rifle. I believe someone may have done this.

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